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3 Reasons Why Fall Is Perfect For Planting

When most people think about the fall they think about dead leaves, diminishing light, and the inevitable appearance of old man winter. No person in their right mind would consider planting at this time of year, right? Wrong! Savvy gardeners know that autumn is the perfect time to make improvements to your garden by adding new plants as well as dividing larger existing plants and moving them about to add new life to your plant beds.

Topics: home landscape ideas

Top 3 Season-Extending Gardening Tips

If you just love gardens with WOW-Factor, the season always seems to come to an end way too soon. Trees, shrubs, and perennials are traditional favorites for creating layers and lots of landscaping interest, but there can be a periodic lapse between flowerings that may cause things to go a little dull.

Topics: home landscape ideas Eco Friendly Landscape

5 Top Fall Tasks To Give Your Landscape The Biggest Bang For Your Buck

Many homeowners don’t realize that fall is a critical time for lawns and gardens. Even though the summer bloom is off, bright colors are beginning to fade, and winter is just around the corner, fall is actually an important time to get your property ready for the next growing season.

Here are five helpful fall tasks that will save you time and money by tackling the right tasks at the right time using the right techniques:

Topics: home landscape ideas Garden Tips Local Landscape

6 Things to Ensure the Perfect Garden Bed Edges

If you’re a gardener or a homeowner with foundation beds, perennial beds or mixed planting borders, chances are you’re already familiar to some degree with the task of edging – the creation of a defining line between one landscape feature and another, such as a lawn and a garden. There is nothing quite like a beautifully cut edge that adds clear boundaries, definition, and neatness to a landscaped area. 
Topics: Landscape Business Local Landscape Landscape Videos

The 411 on Tree Conservation By-Laws

After much of New England lost its forests in the early 19th century to agricultural clearing, shipbuilding, and fuel gathering, the region has seen remarkable reforestation and now boasts a substantial forest-to-developed-landscape ratio in favor of forests. Today, many people don’t give too much thought to trees as a general resource that can benefit both property owners and the public.

Topics: Understand DEP Regulations Environmental Landscape

Marketing Your Landscape Design Project: 5 Ways to Gain Public Support

You’re a commercial property owner or developer and you’ve just spent several months and a significant amount of money developing a landscape project to set your property and business apart from the competition, beautify the neighborhood, and win the hearts and minds of customers and community residents alike. The only problem is, the public isn’t as thrilled with your plans as you are.

Topics: Local Landscape Understand DEP Regulations Commercial Landscape

Preparing for Dept. of Environmental Protection Enforcement Orders: 3 Tips to Minimize the Damage You’ve Done

Property owners undertaking landscaping projects adjacent to watershed resources or other public property without first making application to the local conservation commission often unwittingly run afoul of environmental regulations. Often the property owner is simply unaware of the rules and regulations governing land development in their community.

The lucky ones are those who may have not gone too far with their landscaping project, or who have done work (which may be “damage” in the eyes of the conservation agent or conservation commission), which can be undone or revised to meet by-laws and satisfy the agent or commission. The truly unfortunate ones are those who may have cut down trees that are viewed as vital to protecting water resources or some other environmentally sensitive feature. So how can you minimize and manage the damage you’ve done and still try to keep your landscaping project on track? 

Topics: Understand DEP Regulations Environmental Landscape

How to Weed your garden Like a Pro: Part II

In Part I about weeding your garden like a pro, we discussed mindset and approach. Now, it’s time to demystify all those weeds. What are they all about anyway? I mean, why do they even show up in the first place?

Let’s find out what the heck is going on with weeds.

Some say a weed is any plant you don't want. And on some level that’s true. If you have a specific design – a garden expression -- and an unplanned plant shows up, sure, you can call it a weed and pull it. But is it really a weed? Is a seedling from a maple tree or a Rose of Sharon a weed? Are the new little Black-eyed Susans or Verbena bonariensis blooming in the middle of the boxwood border really so bad?

Topics: Summer Garden Interest Garden Tips

How to Weed Your Garden Like a Pro: Part I

What is it about the task of removing unwanted plants from our garden that causes us to hate it so much? Weeding seems to be the one thing that can turn every gardener into a world-class complainer. Could it be that it is deeply dissatisfying drudgery? Or that it feels endless and soul-crushing? Oh, the dreaded task of weeding!

It seems like something we need to discuss.

First, if you’re a gardener at heart, I’ll bet I can improve your attitude and brighten your spirits if you'll just stick with me through this blog.

Let’s start by talking about two critical components to effective, positive weeding. The first is mindset. The second is approach. When you align the correct mindset with the right approach, weeding isn’t such a painful exercise.

To get into mindset, let's take a shallow dive into the topic of maintenance in general and attitudes toward it and be sure to watch the how-to-weed video below.

Topics: Garden Tips

Legacy Landscapes: The Art of Preservation and Conservation

There are few places in the United States with historical landscapes as rich and diversified as New England. Over the centuries since Europeans first set foot in the New World, the landscape has changed dramatically – from the pre-European open woodlands carefully maintained by the Native Americans to nurture biodiversity for food and shelter, to the thousands of miles of stonewalls and variety of cultivation of the early European settlers, to the recreational and residential landscapes of a growing middle and leisure class.

Today, virtually every New England community has landscapes connected to the past. Old farms from the 18th and 19th centuries, with their meadows, orchards, walls, and shade trees. Estates and facilities from the late 1800s featuring elegant drives and walkways, stately trees, and colorful gardens -- all elaborately designed to showcase the prosperity of the new industrial era.

With increasing environmental awareness there has also come a growing interest in preserving and conserving natural resources and landscapes. Wait a minute, you’re thinking, preserving and conserving? What’s the difference? The short answer is, plenty.

Topics: Eco Friendly Landscape Horticulture Environmental Landscape